A group of frogs were hopping contentedly through the woods, going about their froggy business, when two of them fell into a deep pit. All of the other frogs gathered around the pit to see what could be done to help their companions. When they saw how deep the pit was, the rest of the dismayed group agreed that it was hopeless and told the two frogs in the pit that they should prepare themselves for their fate, because they were as good as dead. Unwilling to accept this terrible fate, the two frogs began to jump with all of their might. Some of the frogs shouted into the pit that it was hopeless, and that the two frogs wouldn’t be in that situation if they had been more careful, more obedient to the froggy rules, and more responsible.

The other frogs continued sorrowfully shouting that they should save their energy and give up, since they were already as good as dead. The two frogs continued jumping as hard as they could, and after several hours of desperate effort were quite weary. Finally, one of the frogs took heed to the calls of his fellows.

Spent and disheartened, he quietly resolved himself to his fate, lay down at the bottom of the pit, and died as the others looked on in helpless grief. The other frog continued to jump with every ounce of energy he had, although his body was wracked with pain, and he was completely exhausted. His companions began a new, yelling for him to accept his fate, stop the pain and just die. The weary frog jumped harder and harder and wonder of wonders! He finally leapt so high that he sprang from the pit.

Amazed, the other frogs celebrated his miraculous freedom and then gathering around him asked, “Why did you continue jumping when we told you it was impossible?” 

Reading their lips, the astonished frog explained to them that he was deaf, and that when he saw their gestures and shouting, he thought they were cheering him on. What he had perceived as encouragement inspired him to try harder and to succeed against all odds.

Effort Never Dies

Most of the time our failures are because we have given up our effort.

You never know how close you are… never give up on your dream.

If you fail, never give up because F.A.I.L. means first Attempt In Learning End is not the end, if fact E.N.D. means Effort Never Dies If you get No as an answer, remember N.O. means Next Opportunity.

Why do we fail in spite of giving all our efforts?

One thing you should know that No-one ever fails. we set our own personal standards so high that we are never likely to reach them.

Because we give up on our dreams, we don’t find where we’re falling and why? Failing is a normal part of human nature.

Even the most successful people have failed many times before succeeding. Practice strategy, concentration, planning, hard-working, and determination are a few words to describe what you might need to succeed.

Success is not easy but if you really want it then you will find a way. It might take time and you might even make more mistakes. Sometimes you even need to find new paths, be open-minded and creative about decision making. When you put your mind into “survival mode” (meaning trying your best) then you are able to be much more effective in how you do anything.

Success might require a lot of skills and maybe a few really well skills. Try to find out what you’re skilled at and want to be skilled at and what you enjoy. Many people are skilled very well at the things they enjoy the most because it makes it much more easier for them to do so. But even then it can get very hard and you might want to quit.

Just remember, as long as you try in life, you no longer will be worried even when you failed something. Because you will still have the other chance to succeed. If your chance to succeed is even 0.00000001% then you can still succeed.

It takes a focus and commitment to be a successful person.

Why do we fall, Bruce? So that we can learn to pick ourselves up.

Learning from the story Don’t Give Up: Effort Never Dies

Experience Learning

Failure is success if we learn from it.

Why Failure Is Good for Success

The sweetest victory is the one that’s most difficult. The one that requires you to reach down deep inside, to fight with everything you’ve got, to be willing to leave everything out there on the battlefield – without knowing, until that do-or-die moment, if your heroic effort will be enough. Society doesn’t reward defeat, and you won’t find many failures documented in history books.

The exceptions are those failures that become steppingstones to later success. Such is the case with Thomas Edison, whose most memorable invention was the light bulb, which purportedly took him 1,000 tries before he developed a successful prototype. “How did it feel to fail 1,000 times?” a reporter asked. “I didn’t fail 1,000 times,” Edison responded. “The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.”

Unlike Edison, many of us avoid the prospect of failure. In fact, we’re so focused on not failing that we don’t aim for success, settling instead for a life of mediocrity. When we do make missteps, we gloss over them, selectively editing out the miscalculations or mistakes in our life’s résumé. “Failure is not an option,” NASA flight controller Jerry C. Bostick reportedly stated during the mission to bring the damaged Apollo 13 back to Earth, and that phrase has been etched into the collective memory ever since. To many in our success-driven society, failure isn’t just considered a non-option – it’s deemed a deficiency, says Kathryn Schulz, author of Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. “Of all the things we are wrong about, this idea of error might well top the list,” Schulz says. “It is our meta-mistake: We are wrong about what it means to be wrong. Far from being a sign of intellectual inferiority, the capacity to err is crucial to human cognition.”

Failure Is Life’s Greatest Teacher

When we take a closer look at the great thinkers throughout history, a willingness to take on failure isn’t a new or extraordinary thought at all. From the likes of Augustine, Darwin and Freud to the business mavericks and sports legends of today, failure is as powerful a tool as any in reaching great success. “Failure and defeat are life’s greatest teachers [but] sadly, most people, and particularly conservative corporate cultures, don’t want to go there,” says Ralph Heath, managing partner of Synergy Leadership Group and author of Celebrating Failure: The Power of Taking Risks, Making Mistakes and Thinking Big. “Instead they choose to play it safe, to fly below the radar, repeating the same safe choices over and over again. They operate under the belief that if they make no waves, they attract no attention; no one will yell at them for failing because they generally never attempt anything great at which they could possibly fail (or succeed).”

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